The Spending Pyramid: Personal Values and Financial Planning (Part I)

Do you ever find yourself wondering where the time has gone at the end of the day? It starts out bright and you perform the required tasks for the day, but the rest of the time has flown by before you realize it? This is often also the case with money.

In his book The Six-Day Financial Makeover, Robert Pagliarini warns that when spending isn’t planned, it often follows this pyramid with money flowing from the top to bottom and reducing in quantity as it trickles down.

Pyramid_Fig1

Like required tasks of the day, Basic Living Expenses are the first things that normally come out of a paycheck. You pay rent, water and electricity bills, insurance, buy groceries etc. However, if there is no plan in place for the rest of the money, whatever is left over often gets spent on Miscellaneous Expenses such as shopping, entertainment and the occasional dining out. Before you know it, there’s very little left over and this little is stretched into the remaining part of the pyramid. This is the kind of lifestyle that tends to lead to living paycheck to paycheck and a continuous cycling of debt.

Robert then suggested a different sort of pyramid which he termed the “Optimized Spending Pyramid”

Pyramid_Fig2

The top part of the pyramid is still Basic Living Expenses while the Miscellaneous Expenses lie at the bottom. Everyone in the finance field will agree that this should always be the case i.e. Pay bills first and then spend chump change on wants. The disagreements arise in the middle portion of the pyramid and the order in which those items should occur. Should Debt be paid off first before establishing Emergency Reserve? Should I give to Charity or the Church when I have debt piling up? Should I be saving for Retirement when I don’t have an Emergency Fund established? And so on and so forth.

The fact is there is not one correct answer. Even when there is an answer that makes sense mathematically, it can be hard to tailor emotions to the arithmetic. This is where personal values come into play. A bible verse says

“Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.” (Luke 12:34)

The order of priority simply depends on how much value you place on each area of the pyramid. If it’s more important to you not to owe anyone anything, you will find yourself focused on Debt Reduction. If you care a lot more about things going on with the less-privileged in your community, Charity will rank higher in that pyramid. If you care a lot more about developing your skills e.g. learning new software for your job or improving your reading skills, Personal Improvement will rank higher on the list. Whatever the case may be, this portion of the pyramid will be ordered entirely on the things you value most.

Money, like time, if not planned wisely often trickles into the areas of life which don’t rank high on the priority list. Therefore establishing a plan is important, but more important is that it should be your own plan. When the created plan is yours and based on your values, you’re more prone or at least have a stronger desire to follow it.

As a follow-up to this article, tomorrow I will connect Dan Pink’s talk about the three aspects of motivation and relate it to how you can begin to arrange the middle portion of this pyramid to fit you.

Note: I found out this morning through Get Rich Slowly that Robert Pagliarini is offering his E-Book Plan Z: How to Survive the Financial Crisis as a free download. I haven’t checked it out but his Six-Day Financial Makeover was easy to read and comprehend and I expect this book to be the same.

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4 responses to this post.

  1. Excellent summary of this concept! Thanks for the mention and the link to free download…

    Reply

  2. Thanks for the comment Robert. I loved your book and I look forward to checking out Plan Z in the coming weeks.

    Reply

  3. Posted by Thad Gibson on September 22, 2009 at 11:52 pm

    Here is a great interview of the author of the book.

    link:

    Controlling Your Finances: What is a ‘spending pyramid’?

    Reply

  4. […] Goal Report « The Spending Pyramid: Personal Values and Financial Planning (Part I) […]

    Reply

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